Browsing Archive: October, 2009

How Philosophers Learn to Walk

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 26, 2009, In : Architectonics 

I am currently working on a paper that begins with the notion that philosophers seek to ‘clear the ground’ – to avoid presupposing what they are seeking to account for – and then seek to walk upon the cleared ground.  They must feel that they ‘walk upon solid ground’ or are ‘in touch with reality’.  This might seem to be a statement of the obvious but if philosophy begins at all it must find the zero-point and then set forth while feeling confident that the system building ...


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Theories of Problems

Posted by Edward Willatt on Tuesday, October 13, 2009, In : Public Philosophy 

I have been ruminating on an issue I raised in a recent post that considered Badiou’s reading of Hegel.  This concerns a theory of problems that is positive and effective rather than problems being things that are always destined to be solved.  The other danger is that they become so established that they structure social space, as the Oedipus Complex does, and thus over-determines and stifles thought and practice.  Different theories of problems may make them insignificant or it may make t...


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Joseph Young 1980-2009

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 12, 2009,

I first met Joe shortly before the start of the MA in Continental Philosophy at the University of Warwick that we both took in 2002-03.  He was reading a copy of the Bhagavad Gita in the corner of the Virgin and Castle public house in Kenilworth which I had just entered with a couple of other Warwick students.  Hearing us talk about philosophy he introduced himself and almost immediately was engaging us in the most scintillating conversation.  The basis of his erudition and skill as a racont...


Continue reading ...
 

'Fragile Verbal Footbridges' in Badiou's History of Philosophy

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 5, 2009, In : Deleuze and Badiou 

At page 170 of Being and Event Badiou ends his reading of Hegel’s philosophy by locating a ‘fragile verbal footbridge’ at its heart.  The unity of his system is said to depend upon a fragile construction which aims to span a gap that for Badiou must be treated very differently.  I am interested in the history of philosophy which runs throughout Being and Event.  The assessment of Hegel here (in Meditation 15) echoes his treatment of Spinoza (in Meditation 10) which I puzzled over in a p...


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Conservatism and the Definition of the Concrete

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 5, 2009, In : Abstract and Concrete 
?

I often listen to BBC Radio 4 and recently enjoyed a program on conservatism and the philosophy behind it (the program formed the last fifteen minutes of The Westminster Hour on 4th October 2009).  The point was made that conservatism seems to avoid philosophy because of its dislike of state control and interference, and of abstract theories.  However, what was interesting was the philosophy that has been developed by conservatives.  Naturally, Roger Scruton was a contributor and argued tha...


Continue reading ...
 
 

Browsing Archive: October, 2009

How Philosophers Learn to Walk

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 26, 2009, In : Architectonics 

I am currently working on a paper that begins with the notion that philosophers seek to ‘clear the ground’ – to avoid presupposing what they are seeking to account for – and then seek to walk upon the cleared ground.  They must feel that they ‘walk upon solid ground’ or are ‘in touch with reality’.  This might seem to be a statement of the obvious but if philosophy begins at all it must find the zero-point and then set forth while feeling confident that the system building ...


Continue reading ...
 

Theories of Problems

Posted by Edward Willatt on Tuesday, October 13, 2009, In : Public Philosophy 

I have been ruminating on an issue I raised in a recent post that considered Badiou’s reading of Hegel.  This concerns a theory of problems that is positive and effective rather than problems being things that are always destined to be solved.  The other danger is that they become so established that they structure social space, as the Oedipus Complex does, and thus over-determines and stifles thought and practice.  Different theories of problems may make them insignificant or it may make t...


Continue reading ...
 

Joseph Young 1980-2009

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 12, 2009,

I first met Joe shortly before the start of the MA in Continental Philosophy at the University of Warwick that we both took in 2002-03.  He was reading a copy of the Bhagavad Gita in the corner of the Virgin and Castle public house in Kenilworth which I had just entered with a couple of other Warwick students.  Hearing us talk about philosophy he introduced himself and almost immediately was engaging us in the most scintillating conversation.  The basis of his erudition and skill as a racont...


Continue reading ...
 

'Fragile Verbal Footbridges' in Badiou's History of Philosophy

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 5, 2009, In : Deleuze and Badiou 

At page 170 of Being and Event Badiou ends his reading of Hegel’s philosophy by locating a ‘fragile verbal footbridge’ at its heart.  The unity of his system is said to depend upon a fragile construction which aims to span a gap that for Badiou must be treated very differently.  I am interested in the history of philosophy which runs throughout Being and Event.  The assessment of Hegel here (in Meditation 15) echoes his treatment of Spinoza (in Meditation 10) which I puzzled over in a p...


Continue reading ...
 

Conservatism and the Definition of the Concrete

Posted by Edward Willatt on Monday, October 5, 2009, In : Abstract and Concrete 
?

I often listen to BBC Radio 4 and recently enjoyed a program on conservatism and the philosophy behind it (the program formed the last fifteen minutes of The Westminster Hour on 4th October 2009).  The point was made that conservatism seems to avoid philosophy because of its dislike of state control and interference, and of abstract theories.  However, what was interesting was the philosophy that has been developed by conservatives.  Naturally, Roger Scruton was a contributor and argued tha...


Continue reading ...
 
 

 

 
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